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Ferrariman

Episode #95 "Borrasca"

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Ferrariman

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timm525

No a big fan of this one.6 for me.

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Tommy Vercetti

The whole mood and tone of this episode is interesting. It's very dark. Was there a power cut at OCB? This is the only episode without Crockett. He is missed but Tubbs and Switek worked very well together. Good to see Switek get highlighted, which he was a lot in S5. The two of them wearing those black suits at night was one thing but during the day in the stifling Miami heat was another. The humidity in Miami can get very extreme so they could've easily collapsed from heat exhaustion.This episode really came to life when the late Brion James came into it. He was excellent. Blade Runner fans get to see Gaff and Leon square off. When we first see him in this ep his acting is similar to when he beats up Deckard in BR. I was expecting him to say "Wake up, time to die!". His delivery of his lines was superb. He was such a sinister presence. Even Castillo was unnerved by him when he strolled into his house and ate the food off his plate. And when he pulled a gun on Castillo in his office I was reminded of when he did the same to Holden in the opening scene of BR. His guest appearance was the undoubted highlight of this episode. The ending was pretty stellar and very good. Reese rescuing Martillo only to fall foul to a sniper's bullet. Then a powerful yet understated closing scene with Castillo saying "I've always tried to do what's right. That's a code I live by". Good episode but it's questionable if it would have been as good without such a great guest star. 8.5/10

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sidboy

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Don't fancy this one a lot !....Rico's beard comes and goes. In his first appearance he has it. In the next scene, the beard is gone. The quick disappearance is covered up by Switek, commenting, "you look better without a beard."

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Spyder

Borrasca's a tough one. I give high marks to anything revolving around Castillo, but I don't like the ones not featuring Sonny at all. It plays like the episode was originally scripted with Crockett, but DJ had other "commitments" so they switched Sonny with Switek instead. Switek was just acting "Crockett-y," in my opinion. In any other episode, Tubbs would have been paired with Sonny. Still have to give it an 8 because I view this and Heart of Night as companion episodes ... kind of like a lesser Golden Triangle.Good to see the Blade Runner reunion on MV, even if EJO and Brion James never acted together in the former. (Same goes for Indian Wars in Season 4, EJO plus Joe Turkel.)

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vicenarc

I give this episode a strong 7. It did not have vey much flare, but I found it to be entertaining. More so in a storyline manner than for flamboyancy which earlier eps were renowned for.

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Tony D.

Posted: March 17 2008 at 9:39am - I've been railroading my wife into watching the episodes with me. Borrasca was too dark, no DJ, Castillo too somber, so she gave it a 6. For me, on the other hand, It was dark, but it worked. The beginning was action packed & the background song fit perfectly. Actually, all the music was great in this episode, especially when Reese meets with Castillo & pulls the gun on him. Great bass work! Tubbs is again with a beard in the intro, so this episode must have come before "Bad Timing" & was switched. Castillo's friend, Arturo should have stayed with carpentry, since he was too trusting with his informants, & it cost him his life. I like Rico's cool black jacket with white polka dots. He was the old Rico from Season 1 when he told Ramos he'd carve his face up as Stan just watched. By the way, Stan begins his gambling addiction in this episode. I love the beach scene, although Stan & Rico look odd dressed in suits walking on the sand to meet the dead Ramos. At the beach bar Stan is hot in his suit but Rico tells him he looks cool! Gina at the OCB looked very pure & "Ladies Home Journal" in her white blouse buttoned to her chin! Reese was a dirty government agent & a dirty slob to boot, eating Castillo's "Jap food". Now the big question is...who killed Martillo in the helicopter? I would say it was Castillo, hidden from view, since he told Tubbs that he always tried to do what was right. "That's the code I live by." Rather than see Martillo escape, I believe Castillo shot him. Reese even said "raise your sight higher" .....meaning Castillo would have wanted him even more than Martillo. This is only speculation after Castillo kind of revealed his guilt to Tubbs at the end. I rate this ep 8.5/10 I rate this an 8 for this poll

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Guest neworder

Another top class Castillo episode in quick succession after Heart of Night. This episode really does show the new darker image of Miami Vice that Season 5 is most famous for. Very little glamour, mostly night time shots, dark clothes, dark night clubs. In short, I love it apart from the god awful clothes that both Tubbs and Switek sport in this episode. The episode boasts a reasnobly decent story and it certainly keeps up the pace. Reece is a decent character, Castillo performs very well and Michael Talbott does an ok job of stepping in for the absent Don Johnson. Overall an 8/10 due to the lack of DJ and the intro sequence is filmed in an annoying way. But overall, strong episode.

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ViceFanMan

Another awesome Castillo centered episode...this one and "Heart of Night" are probably his best, and in my opinion are better than "Bushido" or "Golden Triangle." This one was another emotional one for Castillo, and EJO did a superb job--and the scenes of rivalry between him and Reece always kept you on edge because you knew somewhere along the line something was gonna' happen. ;) But, the acting was awesome and very intense! :glossy:I loved the opening song, Dogs of War by Pink Floyd! :radio: Superb song that totally helped create the mood for the scene, and the all-out gun war that followed! The other notable song was I want Your Hands On Me by Sinead O'Connor--of course that would be her song. ;)Speaking of Sinead's song, it was playing during the wild club scene...loved the multi-colored Medusa-looking dancers--the lighting and colors used were phenomenal! :glossy: It was freaky, and not my "scene"...but it's interesting to watch on TV. ;) I loved the colors used during this episode and especially the pastel buildings at the beginning! The action throughout this one was sizzling, and there was constant threat of gunfire or killings all the time! I love the old Lincoln at the beginning exploding. :cool: Juan Fernandez, as Borrasca, was always the perfect bad guy...but I mainly remember him as one of the bad guys in "Crocodile Dundee II" around the same time. :) But, Brion James was perfect for the role of Edward Reece! He always played the perfect sleezy, scuzzy, freaky-looking, evil bad guy you loved to hate! He was "sick" and creepy :sick: and you only wish he could have been taken out by Castillo too. :pI know this was one where Don Johnson was absent...but I did think the scene where Tubbs "has" to explain why was a little much. Just say Crockett was testifying in another case and wasn't available...you don't have to go on about how he really wished Sonny was there, because he could really help, and on and on. It was a little over-the-top. Plus...poor Stan just could not fill that role of a serious drug dealer/buyer. He still appeared goofy in his slicked back hair, oversized suits, while still "popping" out his corny one-liners. :rolleyes: However, I think this is the first episode we start to realize that Switek has a gambling problem.However, the scene where Switek and Tubbs discover Castillo's friend Art chopped to pieces with machetes was nasty...but pretty effective! I did find the part where Stan gets sick right after seeing that realistic, and understandable. But, poor Gina once again has horrible clothes and hairdos--I mean really?? She's the hottest one there but her fashion makes no sense! :eek:Maybe they were also in previous episodes...but this is the first one I remember noticing scenes "freezing" right before going into commercials. It was different and kind of cool. :cool: The ending was superb--love how Castillo finally showed he's human after all! :eek: He took matters into his own hands...yet still did the right thing. :thumbsup: There were a few aspects that were goofy, or not quite there, for me (as mentioned above)...but overall I enjoyed this one. Good Castillo episode, awesome action and colors...I gave it an 8!

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Jimmy

One of the more superb episodes of S5. The beginning is kinda reminiscent of those of season 1 or 2 prelude shootout scenes. Feels like a classic episode from the start, in a good, refreshing way, by way of early Miami Vice seasons. Things start to mix up when we notice that Crockett is nowhere to be seen. Meanwhile, Switek has taken his place as Tubbs' paretner. The combination of Tubbs And Switek works really well, especially showcasing Switek's personal characteristics, personal traits and flaws which are really highlighted and developed in a later episode,  "Hard Knocks".

 

Things really start to take off when we meet Edward Reese, a man with a mutual history with Castillo. The dialogue between the two really brings up the questions about Castillo's morality and and his own perspectives about the law he upholds. The same dilemmas and questions about one's own morality, which Castillo goes through, can be reflected upon the individuals of today's world, and that is what makes this episode such a special occasion. The deep, and at the same time basic, philosophical ideas that are being kept alive throughout the episode are something that anyone can relate to in their everyday lives. The questions about being right and wrong, perspective and life being black and white or gray is a an everyday routine, if you will.

 

Issues about perspective really clash in this episode, creating an juxtaposition between right and wrong. all depending from which perspective you're looking from. While the 'good' side is being portrayed from Castillos' side, points for greater good can be made from Reese's, 'bad' point of view. It's kinda similar what happened in *No Exit" in season 1, where the vice squad had to surrender Tony Amato to a more powerful national agency for a "greater good".

 

All in all, a really deep, thought provoking episode. 9,5/10, Good acting, amazing cast & chemistry and a profound message. One of the more solid episodes of season 5. 

 

 

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Tom

Great episode despite Crockett's absence!

Truman's score is extremely well, especially in the threatening OCB night scene with Reese and when Arturo Oribe sneaks onto the ship.

The end is unbelievably well executed in details. The red spot of the sniper's gun on Borrasca's body is zooming in, freezes, then slowly fades exactly into Castillo sitting in his home, telling Tubbs openly that he had to do it, but in his very special words.

One of the best eps of the whole series for me.

Edited by Tom

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Crockettt

So Castillo killed Borasca ?

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Tom

So Castillo killed Borasca ?

The final scene and Castillo's last words ("I always tried to do what is right. That's the code I live by") would not make sense otherwise. To make it even more obvious, Tubbs starts the final conversation with something like "Reese already had Borrasca in the chopper when the shot was fired. But I am sure you know that already". Director Vern Gillum was also so nice to use a perfect cross fade from the red spot on Borrasca's body with the noise of the shot to Castillo's body in his living room. That' s something you won't find described in any script, that's the director's way to underline the punchline the screenwriters had up on their sleeves.I am always surprised that so many viewers have not realized all that. It makes perfect sense. Castillo could not win against against Reese in an open fight. The nightly OCB scene where Reese threathened Castillo made this clear. So Castillo had to do what he had to do. His codex always was that he had to protect innocent people at all cost. He freaked out on Dale Menton in Golden Triangle. In Evan he even risked a fight with the ATF ("these Mac 10s will not be sold in Miami"). Borrasca as a provider of hundreds of kilos of dope was a menace to society that he had to take out as nobody else would have done it. Even for the price to commit murder. Edited by Tom
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Matt5

The final scene and Castillo's last words ("I always tried to do what is right. That's the code I live by") would not make sense otherwise. To make it even more obvious, Tubbs starts the final conversation with something like "Reese already had Borrasca in the chopper when the shot was fired. But I am sure you know that already". Director Vern Gillum was also so nice to use a perfect cross fade from the red spot on Borrasca's body with the noise of the shot to Castillo's body in his living room. That' s something you won't find described in any script, that's the director's way to underline the punchline the screenwriters had up on their sleeves.I am always surprised that so many viewers have not realized all that. It makes perfect sense. Castillo could not win against against Reese in an open fight. The nightly OCB scene where Reese threathened Castillo made this clear. So Castillo had to do what he had to do. His codex always was that he had to protect innocent people at all cost. He freaked out on Dale Menton in Golden Triangle. In Evan he even risked a fight with the ATF ("these Mac 10s will not be sold in Miami"). Borrasca as a provider of hundreds of kilos of dope was a menace to society that he had to take out as nobody else would have done it. Even for the price to commit murder.

 

 

Good point Tom 

I always struggled with the darkness of this episode and the no Don !! But that is only my opinion  :D

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Jimmy

The final scene and Castillo's last words ("I always tried to do what is right. That's the code I live by") would not make sense otherwise. To make it even more obvious, Tubbs starts the final conversation with something like "Reese already had Borrasca in the chopper when the shot was fired. But I am sure you know that already". Director Vern Gillum was also so nice to use a perfect cross fade from the red spot on Borrasca's body with the noise of the shot to Castillo's body in his living room. That' s something you won't find described in any script, that's the director's way to underline the punchline the screenwriters had up on their sleeves.I am always surprised that so many viewers have not realized all that. It makes perfect sense. Castillo could not win against against Reese in an open fight. The nightly OCB scene where Reese threathened Castillo made this clear. So Castillo had to do what he had to do. His codex always was that he had to protect innocent people at all cost. He freaked out on Dale Menton in Golden Triangle. In Evan he even risked a fight with the ATF ("these Mac 10s will not be sold in Miami"). Borrasca as a provider of hundreds of kilos of dope was a menace to society that he had to take out as nobody else would have done it. Even for the price to commit murder.

 

Excellent points. What really fascinates me is the lengths Castillo is willing to go to enforce his codes and morals, sometimes stepping over to the other side, going vigilante. There's really no gray area for him. But I wonder, did Reese get to Castillo? Was he able to provoke him to go such lengths? Was the case all about "doing the right thing", or just something as trivial as not letting your rival win?

 

Castillo's character is being built like that of an superhuman, all-knowing entity who doesn't let emotions get in the way. Always confident, almost to an extent where he is deemed arrogant. I feel like that premise has been compromised in this episode and we get to experience Castillo's vulnerabilities and human-like qualities. Having to deal with Reese in addition to Arturo Oribe's murder (one of the rare occasions where we see Castillo smile is him meeting Art at his workshop in the beginning of the episode) puts Castillo in tough spot. The fact that these occurrences could have possibly stirred up emotions that would have affected his police work is interesting.

 

In the last scene we see more of Castillo's more warmer, human side where he explains himself to Tubbs. We get to see the side of Castillo that cares about what others think about him, isn't that confident and even doubts himself. It's almost like he is trying to convince himself that he did the right thing. 

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Tom

But I wonder, did Reese get to Castillo? Was he able to provoke him to go such lengths? Was the case all about "doing the right thing", or just something as trivial as not letting your rival win?

Good question. My perception is that Castillo went that far because Reese followed NO rules. That's why Castillo did the call to Washington to find out whether Reese was officially authorized or not. If they had told him that this was an official company mission, he would have let Reese alone. But the shady authorization underlined by the gun pointed at his head in his own OCB, was a clear sign that Reese was simply an uncontrollable criminal and this was the trigger for Castillo not to back off. Edited by Tom

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Vice Immersion

It was nice to finally see Switek go undercover as a high rolling drug distributor with Tubbs; it put him in a different light that we don't normally see him under.  Plus, we see the beginning of Switek’s gambling behavior here with the phone call.

 

It was a powerful episode that displayed Castillo's own struggle in abiding by the law, which somewhat paralleled closely to Crockett's own struggle.

 

Before this episode, Castillo was portrayed as the unshakeable, disciplined, and very rarely disconcerted by emotions, but after his encounter with Edward Reese at Castillo's own home, we observe that there is a deeper weakness when Resse gives the line, "America:  Somebody's gotta look out for it.  You quit."  Referring to the time when Castillo was involved with the DEA back at the Golden Triangle ("Golden Triangle, Part II"), and compromised CIA interests by Castillo trying to stop Lao Li.  (With the CIA interests wanting to stop the spread of communism in Southeast Asia.)  Despite these events happening five years before the episode of the "Golden Triangle, Part II", the subject is still sensitive for Castillo as his anger culminated into briefly choking Dale Menton.  The contrasting table manners between Reese and Castillo reflected their personalities with Reese being coarse and boorish while Castillo was refined and proper.

 

I wonder if the show possibly hints that Castillo suffered some form of American government retaliation, and experienced a severe demotion (working in Miami’s Vice Department rather than advancing upward in a federal agency) in trying to do the “right thing†by stopping the flow of illicit drugs.

 

We see Castillo’s fragility in wanting Tubbs to stay after explaining how he always tried to do what’s right, culminating with the line “Do you understand that?† Seemingly as if Castillo is trying to grapple and explain himself to Tubbs after confessing he was the one who shot Martillo Borrasca, but of course, Castillo didn't reveal that to Tubbs.  I guess with Ernesto Lupe (the Catholic priest from “God’s Workâ€) dead and yet another friend of his killed, Arturo Uribe (the retired detective), it makes sense that eventually Castillo would begin to show his softer and conflicted side to the OCB team.

 

I think with Castillo’s character in the aftermath of the Golden Triangle incident; the assumed loss of his wife, the betrayal from CIA operatives, and probably being blackballed by the American government for going against CIA interests, it forced Castillo to adhere even closer to a higher morality above American patriotism after being inundated with so much retaliation for the same organization or government that he was trying to uphold and protect.   I think this higher morality (probably spiritual) is implied with Castillo adopting some East Asian customs, and with Ernesto Lupe writing in Castillo’s Bible (in the episode, “God’s Workâ€), "To my friend Marty, all of the answers aren't written on the wind, some are right here.â€

 

This episode seemed to display more similarities between Castillo and Crockett than what we previously knew beforehand.  For me, it's a much better episode than “Heart of Night†since it revealed more of Castillo’s character, rather than merely dragging on a plot line (the unfilled romance between him and May Ying) that didn’t take the characters anywhere or reveal anything profound about them.  It's also an episode to keep in mind, as the season follows the progression of Crockett's burnout, in regards to Castillo's possible viewpoint toward it.

Edited by Vice Immersion

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Jerry B.

I always liked the episode. I like everything with Marty in action, and - honestly - I can enjoy an ep without Sonny.

 

Come on guys, he's been given lots of exposure all the series thru. I mean, way more than anyone else. If in one ep he's out, I think we can survive ;-)

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AzVice

this has always been one of my least favorite episodes. So dark and dreary with nothing to brighten it. They even have Stan in a black overcoat on the beach "this suit's hot". It's just joyless to watch....which Miami Vice shouldn't be. Upon rewatching it i felt it actually had a decent storyline in there, but it SO Needed some music and scenery to make it palatable.

to me Castillo did a couple things out of character. First he brings in an ex agent who promptly gets murdered. Then he seemingly kills Borrasca which is way out of bounds for him.

5/10

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Remington

This episode should be watched before Bad Timing.

Honestly, this episode is just too damn dark and dreary for my tastes.

It's got some great elements. The club scenes are great, the colors, the villains, and the action was pretty solid.

I had a hard time seeing Switek in black lol.

Liked seeing Castillo undercover again.

I actually haven't watched this one in quite a while so not much too say.

6/10

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vicegirl85
On 7/15/2015 at 2:48 AM, Vice Immersion said:

I wonder if the show possibly hints that Castillo suffered some form of American government retaliation, and experienced a severe demotion (working in Miami's Vice Department rather than advancing upward in a federal agency) in trying to do the "right thing" by stopping the flow of illicit drugs.

This is exactly what I have always thought.

Edited by vicegirl85

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