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Ferrariman

Episode #92 "Redemption In Blood"

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Matt5

Right. Only "drawback" is that the show is very depressive, even nihilistic now. That is perfectly underlined by very stilish but cool colors like the scene in the sauna.And Tim Truman's sound is very importan to support this new tone. I cannot imagine Jan Hammer's lighter sound as score anymore.If you skip seasons three and four, season five seems to be a different show. If you watch all seasons in consecutive order, then the new tone is a logical consequence of what has happened.

 

 

Agreed Tom - Hammer's fluffier sound would not have worked with Season 5 at all 

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Matt5

One of the best of Season 5 - very dark and character driven - great visuals and songs in this one too  :D

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Vice Immersion

"Redemption In Blood"... couldn't be a more spot-on title for what Sonny Crockett must do, considering the amount of bloodshed he had inflicted while being Sonny Burnett.

 

By the time the episode "Hostile Takeover" ends, we see that Sonny has committed the lowest form of manipulation and sociopathic behavior by betraying Tubbs (after the many times they had saved each others lives in the past) when he discovers Rico's true identity, and begins shooting at Rico.  The knowledge of who Rico is has been recollected, but there's still a Burnett form of emotional detachment and apathy.  Though, as ineffective as Tubbs may have thought in having an effect bringing back Sonny, a small trickle of humanity begins to seep into Sonny's psyche as we see him turn away after Cliff fires upon a boat with a Stinger missle, and lets the tortured subordinates of El Gato's cartel live.

 

Ironically, in which some drink alcohol excessively to forget or dull their painful memories of life, are actually used to remind him more of his former life (specifically with Caitlin and Tubbs).  As Cliff and Celeste plan to eliminate Sonny, Sonny seems to have a deeper grasp on the magnitude of death as he remembers being shot in "A Bullet For Crockett" and his friend Evan being killed in "Evan".

 

The most profound scene though that finally jolts Sonny back into the redemptive pathway toward being Crockett is the hotel room scene after the limo explosion.  As Sonny slowly puts the pieces together of how the limousine explosion occurred and by whom, the audience senses that Sonny's personality hasn't changed at all as he shows Burnett's revengeful and shrewd side in figuring it out.  By the time we see him take it step by step (being in the arena, Celeste going to get her purse, and Burnett walking to the limo), he's immediately prepared to kill Celeste as Sonny confronts the same calculated, deceitful, and malicious motivations that has surrounded his world, and the people who reinforced this atmosphere within the drug underworld.

 

...But just as Celeste states that she loves him, and Sonny sarcastically responding that she had a funny way of showing it, he pauses as the scene seems to imply how he was able to put the last step together and reflects on those same words ("..funny way of showing it") before the limousine exploding, in how she had called out to him to warn him.  This particular act of kindness seems to defy every logical reason Sonny can come up with, as he knows Celeste could have done financially better without him and could have made him expendable like the Carreras (Oscar and Miguel), even more so, risked the chance of being killed herself when she helped bring him back to health by bringing in the ER doctor.  Ironically enough, the statement ("...funny way of showing it") rings more true than Sonny could have imagined, as this act of sacrifical love is clearly beyond Sonny's comprehension as he releases Celeste and gazes intently on the mirror.  It becomes the watershed moment.  The same strong emotions that were torturing him in "Deliver Us From Evil" and were strong enough to breakout of his mental suppression in "Mirror Image", become strangely enough, the saving force that makes him to confront these benevolent emotions and action, and in the process, crumbles the moral dissociation his subconscious had created.  With his moral dissociation crumbling away, and memory flashbacks reminding him of his moral identity with "...That's me" and "I'm glad I'm just back in the real world...", it makes Sonny to initiate offering compassion to Celeste by opening his arms toward her.

 

With the poignant song of "Don't Give Up" by Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush playing in the scene, we see Sonny walking through a foreign world of benevolence, seeing the warmth and happiness between friends, families, and couples on a Miami park.  A stark contrast to the criminal underworld that was motiviated by self-serving ambitions that were perpetual reinforcement for Sonny's cruel Burnett persona.  It appears that subconsciously his curious mind seems to gravitate toward the OCB as it seems to mysteriously radiate this foriegn emotional energy of warmth and benevolence, only to be genuinely suprised that guns are drawn upon him.  It's only when Stan and Castillo talk with Sonny, does Sonny seem to understand the full story of what happened during his time as Burnett, particularly the early times ("Mirror Image"), and when he's horrified to hear that he shot Tubbs twice.

 

With Sonny now fully realizing the extent of his betrayal toward the OCB team (particularly with Tubbs) and the law, the manipulation and bloodshed he had created as being Burnett, he realizes that the only way to redeem himself is to destroy the empire that he had so brutally created and strived in achieving.  This is seen when he contacts OCB and has them raid the abandoned water treatment plant (the site of the drug meet), and also saves Tubbs to validate his changed persona and intentions.  In a gesture of appreciation for saving him (not only physically with the explosion, but particularly mentally), Sonny seems to forewarn Celeste to leave as this drug empire collapses to avoid criminal prosecution, and possible criminal retaliation if she becomes forced to testify against the cartel.

 

A great conclusion for the Sonny Burnett arc!  Although it didn't have the "full on wage war" climax against Burnett that some might have expected with the suspense rising in "Hostile Takeover", the turn of events was actually much more satisfying than that because it focused on Crockett's character and his psyche (with all of its twists and turns) and drew upon the cumulative experiences of this beloved character as to how he became Burnett and returned to being Crockett.  One very small complaint I have, is that I do wish though that this arc would have shown a little bit more of the reactions from Gina, Trudy, and Stan to again highlight the camaraderie of OCB, and the magnitude of loss in watching Sonny becoming Burnett as we saw with Rico.

 

Though overall, what makes this four episode arc outstanding and effective is not only the believable mental path in Sonny's psychological descent to becoming Burnett and ascent in returning to be Crockett, but the use of imagery, music, and others forms of cinematography that makes Sonny's emotions much more palpable to the audience, and also somewhat haunting, as it makes the audience to reflect about their own psychological tenacity admist the extreme tides of emotion that accompany the hurricane-sized storms of life can bring.

 

It makes me wish that more of the Miami Vice episodes had this type of character-focus tone as this arc (though not necessarily a character turning bad/evil), which would give the show a richer experience in observing these characters navigate their lives working in the stressful, criminal underworld.

Edited by Vice Immersion
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Remington

Damn I love the opening to this one. Took me a while to realize that was the same lighthouse from The Hit List. Lol talk about different scenes.

Excellent cinematography as with the previous episode.

Burnett has more and more flashbacks.

Love the sequence where he returns to OCB.

Standout scenes include the limo explosion and the scene where Burnett confronts Celeste. Pretty intense.

From the opening up until Crocketts lunch with Cliff, this is an excellent episode. Honestly though I thought the climax was a bit of letdown. From Crockett being recognized by the punk to the old I'm Slipping cliche, it just didn't sit well for me.

I'm not as El Gato fan but I love the ending.

I still hate that Crockett used the Burnett name after this episode.

8/10

Edited by Remington
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Remington

Re-watched this last night. Gonna give it an extra point because I think I'm in LWP with Celeste.:)

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Matt5
29 minutes ago, Remington said:

Re-watched this last night. Gonna give it an extra point because I think I'm in LWP with Celeste.:)

Ha ha - great reference "LWT" of course a nod to Nobody Lives Forever :hippie: 

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APalFromHawaii

Good episode. My favorite scene is when Crockett returns to the department. Very touching! :freeze:

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Dadrian
1 hour ago, APalFromHawaii said:

Good episode. My favorite scene is when Crockett returns to the department. Very touching! :freeze:

Indeed. “Don’t Give Up” fit so perfectly there. 

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Matt5
22 hours ago, APalFromHawaii said:

Good episode. My favorite scene is when Crockett returns to the department. Very touching! :freeze:

That was beautifully done - classic Miami Vice !:hippie:

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Matt5
21 hours ago, Dadrian said:

Indeed. “Don’t Give Up” fit so perfectly there. 

It really did - and nice to see producers return to the “So” album for the first time since the first half of Season 3:xmas:

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